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Developing a Growth-Based Culture

22 days ago by Luigi Muscat Filletti
Online discussion

Today’s business environments are competing in unprecedented times which require great agility and adaptability. The digital age continues to encourage the adoption of high-end technologies, and organisations who do not make the right investments towards their digitisation efforts are feared to fall behind. Amidst such developing times, however, the prime assets of organisations small and large have remain unchanged.

"Companies need their employees to perform at their greatest capacity, and employees need to continuously feel that they are valued throughout their efforts in doing so.

It is now more important than ever for organisations to make the necessary steps in ensuring the prioritisation of their people. Companies need their employees to perform at their greatest capacity, and employees need to continuously feel that they are valued throughout their efforts in doing so. Worldwide, employers and business leaders are aligning their attempts in structuring working cultures which are predominately based on performance enhancement. Such efforts, however, may compromise workforce health and sustainability.

"A culture of growth fundamentally focuses on the connectivity of people.

Rather, an approach which is fuelled by a need for growth might be the first step in ultimately achieving better performance. Fostering a culture of growth at the workplace helps establish greater qualities of value and wellbeing, which essentially contribute towards increased efficiency and productivity.

A culture of growth fundamentally focuses on the connectivity of people. This resides in the internal engagement between an employee and the perception of their role and value within their organisation, as well as the external engagement between them and their colleagues. Essentially, a growth-based culture allows employees to structure their capacity, acknowledge their shortcomings and learn from their mistakes. As a result, employees become more confident and utilise their energy towards generating external value. Such an approach is many times taken for granted in the fast-paced working landscapes that we have become accustomed to. This may be because many employers might associate such growth-based cultures to emotionally-driven rather than rationally-driven concepts, shunning such strategies due to the common notion that personal matters and concerns should not be brought into the workplace. What might not be well-enough considered though, is that the attitudes and behaviours of the upcoming Millennial generation, which is forming the majority of the world’s working population, are different to those of older generations. Work-life balance is being redefined, desirable working environments are continuously changing and flexible working demands continue to evolve too. How people feel and more importantly, their reactions to such feelings, become a delicate yet significant factor to a company’s bottom line. Research by Robert Kegan and Lisa Lahey has outlined a few components required to successfully developing a growth culture, listed below.

Trustworthy Working Environments

Maintaining a working environment in which leaders display qualities of vulnerability and take personal responsibility for their actions helps structure a sense of trust. Leaders can become role models through which employees can look up to and approach without hesitation. This creates a more comfortable workplace environment and allows employees to not be afraid to make mistakes and more importantly, develop their skills and communicative qualities to ensure consistency. Moreover, employees should be given regular opportunities to voice their concerns. By anonymously sharing their opinions in areas relevant to trust, standards, productivity and wellbeing, employers would be able to receive quality feedback to view the company from the eyes of its people. Senior team leaders should take on board such information and genuinely try to structure development within their teams, paying attention to feedback individualistically as well as holistically. It goes without saying that such a practice helps prevent unnecessary tension between employees and provides a safer, more trustworthy environment for employees to engage with others and practice self-awareness at the workplace.


Introducing Continuous Learning

The digital age is evolving constantly, and business leaders must make sure that their people are up to date with the latest business trends and technological advancements. From best practices to enhanced automated technologies, leaders must be on the ball to set flow and direction to where they want to be going and equipping their workforce with the necessary tools and knowledge to help them get there. Continuous Learning continues to be a great way for an organisation’s people to benefit from bespoke coaching and e-learning solutions carried out by world-class practitioners who deliver tangible insight and introduce effective working methods to help reach business goals more effectively.


Practicing Continuous Feedback

Across all departments, team leaders should make it a point to give consistent feedback to their employees to keep them in the know and aware about how their work is being valued, and indicating ways through which it can be improved and optimised. This forms a greater sense of community derived through a shared effort in helping all members grow and develop their skills. Teams can meet once a week to share progress and pin-point any set-backs being experienced. By openly encouraging honest feedback, teams can not only troubleshoot issues and strengthen their work, but also instil better team-playing attributes across all members.

"the overall satisfaction and trust experienced by an employee will help drive them to achieving a results-driven approach to their work


A growth-based culture is different to a performance-driven culture as it does not create stress-induced scenarios wherein employees feel pressured to perform. Most certainly, results do matter, but the overall satisfaction and trust experienced by an employee will help drive them to achieving a results-driven approach to their work, this through the awareness that they are being valued and heard, and that their failures are being acknowledged as they make the necessary steps to succeed and obtain those results.

It is therefore becoming increasingly critical for companies to reevaluate the importance of their people and put into place a structure which nurtures growth. By balancing a strong work-ethic with empathy and honesty, business leaders are sure to reassure their people that they are all on the same path and that all contributions matter. Prioritising growth means making sure that all the right factors are put into play to maximise performance, and asks of employees not how much can be taken out of them, but rather, how much can they take out from the robust resources and stellar conditions granted to them to help them succeed.

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