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Sourcing Talent to Implement Digital Strategies

8 months ago by Luigi Muscat Filletti
Sourcing Talent to Implement Digital Strategies

As evolving technologies of Cloud Computing, Big Data and Internet of Things progressively introduce themselves as effective methods of enhancing digital growth, the area of consideration becomes how companies should infuse these technologies in their daily operations. Undoubtedly, the right expertise is needed, and a company must source professionals who can align themselves with the vision and objectives of the business in order to constructively work towards that common goal.

‘A company must source professionals who can align themselves with the vision and objectives of the business’

The development of technology over the last decade alone has resulted in a steady demand for professionals pursuing careers in Tech in Malta. In relation to Financial sectors, the introduction of Cloud-based software in Banking generated plenty job opportunities in software development in Malta, as banks began to adopt strategies to develop their digital game. However, there is still insufficient supply for the demand in these areas of expertise in Tech, and companies continue to struggle when coming to grips with an effective way forward.

‘Companies must practice self-awareness in order to assess the skills gap of the organisation …

… the first step to implementing any digital strategy is to acknowledge the current situation in terms of skill availability.’

As of present, not all organisations possess employees with the right skillsets to develop successful A.I. strategies, yet this is certainly not something to feel inferior about. Rather, companies must practise self-awareness in order to assess the skills gap of the organisation. Is the company’s vision a realistic one when taking into account the in-house expertise available? Are digital objectives well-matched with the skills of the workforce? The first step to implementing any digital strategy is to acknowledge the current situation in terms of skill availability. The realisation of a skills gap is more common than one may think. In fact, when examining SMEs it is no surprise to consider uncommon, a company who possesses the right talent and skills needed to tick all the right boxes for any digital endeavour.

‘The changing landscape of working culture means that current and upcoming talent looks and feels different to how it was a decade ago.’

Thus, sourcing talent remains a focal point for companies who plan on growing digitally, and this means that employer branding continues to act as a core component to attract the right talent. However, a lot of attention is being directed towards employer branding solely for recruitment purposes. What not all companies are realising is that the changing landscape of working culture means that current and upcoming talent looks and feels different to how it was a decade ago. Technology is affecting our personal lives, and it goes without saying that Millennials and Gen Z have been brought up in a time when technology witnessed its most rapid acceleration, in oppose to Generation X and Baby Boomers.

‘Moreover, freelancers in Tech are on the rise, meaning that the gig economy is no longer a concept, but a reality which companies sourcing talent should deeply consider pursuing.’

So much so, that working traditions are evolving further. The standard office hours no longer hold for some companies. Flexible working is no longer introduced as an employee benefit, but is becoming a standard practice, and remote-working options are being encouraged to enhance employee productivity. Moreover, freelancers in Tech are on the rise, meaning that the gig economy is no longer a concept, but a reality which companies sourcing talent should deeply consider pursuing.

‘It’s time to rethink not who companies recruit, but how they recruit.’

Therefore, as working cultures evolve, the recruiting culture must continuously adapt to it. Through technology, people’s daily personal lives are evolving, and this has its effects on their professional lives too - people are working differently, and as tech is becoming more fast-paced, we are becoming fast-paced with it. Work life balance is becoming one in the same for younger generations, the distinction between the two less contrasting, as for some individuals, areas of work versus leisure are shifting towards areas of purpose and fulfilment.

‘The rising gig economy is now a contending solution for the skills gap, allowing companies to source the right expertise from a talent pool of Tech specialists.’

It’s time to rethink not who companies recruit, but how they recruit. The rising gig economy is now a contending solution for the skills gap, allowing companies to source the right expertise from a talent pool of Tech specialists. Thus, this segment of the working population provide an extension of the skillsets needed by companies of all sizes, presenting opportunities for organisations to develop close working relationships with professionals on short-term, project-based jobs, with the possibility of retaining such talent down the line for similar, more frequent digital projects.