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Flexible Employer Branding Approaches

16 days ago by Luigi Muscat Filletti
Flexible Employer Branding Approaches

The attraction and retention of top talent continues to prove a challenge for companies of all industries. The same way that companies are fighting for the attention of the customer in a digital age which is data-driven, those same companies are competing for the best talent to help achieve these objectives.

Priorities are being directed towards digital growth to enhance user experience and quality of service. The attentiveness and loyalty of the user are focal points for any digital goal, and gathering the right team of professionals to fuel and achieve these aims means that employer branding efforts must be a prime concern on their agenda.

‘As working practices are developing, companies must tailor their employer branding approach to synchronise with the demands of candidates.’

However, companies must first recognise that different people are attracted to work at a particular company for different reasons. Of course, the company’s position in the market, the level and quality of its products and services, its workplace environment, company culture and employee benefits are all main components which lure candidates in. It’s one thing promoting all these areas and pushing such components are strong points for talent attraction and retention, yet still, a company might wish to go a step further.

‘If a company is structuring the same employer branding strategy for a Gen X candidate as they are for a Millennial, then they must rethink their approach.’

As working practices are developing, companies must tailor their employer branding approach to synchronise with the demands of candidates. This means that there is no ‘one size fits all approach’, as fundamentally, different people lead different lifestyles, prioritise different areas of life and desire different benefits. If a company is structuring the same employer branding strategy for a Gen X candidate as they are for a Millennial, then they must rethink their approach. Of course, the attraction of an undergraduate in preparation for a career in software development in Malta to apply for an internship role at a company will surely be different to the attraction of a Tech professional with five plus years experience in their field, seeking a new challenge or opportunity for growth.

‘Fundamentally, companies should align themselves with the demands and concerns of the talent they wish to acquire.’

Similarly, an accountant currently fulfilling a high role at a company which occupies an average position in the market might wish a job change to secure an opportunity with a leading company in the market, even at the possibility of accepting a slightly less important role, in the ambition that they will work their way up by time. Why might this be? Factors of career progression, confidence (or lack, thereof) in product quality and company vision might influence a person to seeking a new career path. On the other hand, a professional in tech or finance earning a high salary with a top company might consider a job change to jump into a start-up idea which they feel confident about. Factors of risk, complete task ownership and desire to influence company direction would all play a role here.

‘Maintaining clear communication between company and candidate will help ensure understanding in what the company can offer in accordance to what the candidate (potential employee) desires.’

Fundamentally, companies should align themselves with the demands and concerns of the talent they wish to acquire. No doubt, this is much easier said than done, as the question remains as to how companies can narrow down these components to successfully communicate what they bring to the table for their workforce. What is certain is that a human approach is essential - maintaining clear communication between company and candidate will help ensure understanding in what the company can offer in accordance to what the candidate (potential employee) desires.

‘Companies should once more tailor their employer branding approach not only according to the type of talent they wish to recruit, but also the type of recruitment method …

… who they wish to recruit, and how.’

On a final note, companies should be open-minded in the way they consider the working population. Employer branding practices must also be aligned with recruitment trends, especially with freelance workers and the rise of the gig economy, companies are being offered alternative recruitment methods which are centred about short-term contracts. This segment of professionals will not be experiencing the workplace environment or company culture as much as their full-time coworkers will be. In addition to this, gig workers will not pay attention to a company promoting its flexible or remote working options either, as this would simply not apply for them.

In this sense, companies should once more tailor their employer branding approach not only according to the type of talent they wish to recruit, but also the type of recruitment method. This identification will allow a company to then structure the appropriate employer branding procedure, one which is relevant and considerate of who they wish to recruit, and how.