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Attracting GIG Economy Talent

10 months ago by Luigi Muscat Filletti
Attracting GIG Economy Talent

Through the digital age, the recruitment sphere continues to experience shifts in structure which is reshaping the way companies attract and retain talent. The methods of the working landscape such as routine, schedules and corporate cultures are evolving through diversity, as the Millennial generation is becoming all set to take their stand as the next line of industry leaders.

'Companies must shape a suitable approach with regards to their employer branding efforts'

Thus, working cultures continue to develop in a time which is data-driven, as the popularity and demand for remote working options as well as the number of gig workers on the job market progresses steadily. This means that companies must shape a suitable approach with regards to their employer branding efforts, this in an attempt to communicate the company’s employer brand in a way which is clear and distinguishable. For the segment of gig economy workers (or freelancers), a company must adopt a strategic employer branding approach which is different to that of the usual job market. Since gig workers possess different working demands due to them working remotely on flexible schedules, this segment of the working population do not look for the employee benefits and perks which are being promoted by companies as part of their attractive employer branding strategies.

‘Working cultures thus continue to develop in a time which is data-driven, as the popularity and demand for remote working options as well as the number of gig workers on the job market progresses steadily.’

Of course, there are parallels in both types of approaches, with the most obvious being that of creating brand awareness. Being out in the market amongst competition, a company must outline its purpose and effectively communicate what it brings to the table in terms of value, both externally as a product and internally as a culture. Gig workers must comprehend what the company is offering and what it is promising in order to have a positive perception of the company for them to be able to understand what they can bring to the company through their professional skills. Great gig workers are well aware of industry trends and affairs, proactively identifying how they can incorporate their skills and expertise to various companies in their industry. Gig workers possess their own personal brand through their portfolio of work and clients, and so appreciate when companies openly communicate their employer brand in a way which is inclusive and collaborative.

‘Rather, companies must promote that working for them is a direct contribution to industry innovation, influencing company direction whilst having complete independence and task ownership.’

Once giving employer branding the prominence it deserves, companies must keep in mind that they must engage with gig workers in a way which is different to how they engage with the rest of the job market. Most evidently, as mentioned previously gig workers do not seek the same employee benefits, and are not affected by the company workplace environment (although a good impression certainly does no harm). The stark difference therefore is that for this segment of workers, companies must promote that working for them does not entail going to a particularly attractive office, benefiting from attractive perks or participating in fun employee events (although optional). Rather, companies must promote that working for them is a direct contribution to industry innovation, influencing company direction whilst having complete independence and task ownership.

‘Companies can strategise their employer branding approach to the gig economy by creating a focal point towards company purpose and objectives.’

With this in mind, companies can strategise their employer branding approach to embrace the gig economy by creating a focal point towards company purpose and objectives. Highlighting how the company works to ensure the satisfaction of its employees by putting its people first, is the right way forward. As a result, this will also communicate a great company culture, one which is accompanied by values. In addition, the publishing of company news and updates or objectives on current and upcoming projects is a great way to provide technical substance to gig workers, in an attempt to really put them into the picture about what it’s like to work for the company.

‘This strategic approach can allow a consistent influx of top talent to the doors of the company…’

On a final note, companies should not simply promote what skills and expertise are needed to undertake a project, but rather, effectively communicate what they wish their objectives to be as a result of the completion of that project. Once over, by laying out aims and long-term vision besides the traditional job description and requirements, gig workers who feel they can match their skillet to the job in question can confidently approach the company, who should be open to discussion. This strategic approach can allow a consistent influx of top talent to the doors of the company - this way candidates (gig workers) can be differentiated in terms of skills and expertise, allowing the company to increase its talent pool. This, in turn, will keep the company in touch with a range of professionals who would now form part of their network of talent.

Therefore, as working cultures evolve, companies must develop a proactive employer branding approach to attract top talent in the gig economy, a segment of workers who are becoming increasingly common to the job market. By putting in place the right set of methods to attract gig working professionals, companies are placing themselves in an advantageous position for this segment of the working population, increasing their relevance in an already competitive market.